Sunday, December 29, 2013

Join us for an EPIC holiday party!

Join us at the Peace and Freedom Party Potluck holiday party!
January 4, 2014. 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.
at the Niebyl Proctor Marxist Library. 6501 Telegraph Ave. Oakland.
Anyone may attend.
You can say hello to Cindy Sheehan. Also, please sign a petition at the party to help put her on the ballot.
If you want more details or can come early to help set up the party, please phone John at (510) 703-4625.


Saturday, December 21, 2013

"Why I am running for State Assembly, 15th District, in 2014" by Eugene E. Ruyle

For more information on Eugene E. Ruyle's Campaign for Peace and Socialismgo to my campaign website [ru4peace.wordpress.com]
---
As a working class, socialist party in the heartland of world imperialism, the Peace and Freedom Party should be raising issues of peace and socialism in every partisan and non-partisan election. As long ago as 1850, Marx and Engels wrote that: "Even where there is no prospect of achieving their election the workers must put up their own candidates to preserve their independence, to gauge their own strength and to bring their revolutionary position and party standpoint to public attention. They must not be led astray by the empty phrases of the democrats, who will maintain that the workers' candidates will split the democratic party and offer the forces of reaction the chance of victory. All such talk means, in the final analysis, that the proletariat is to be swindled. The progress which the proletarian party will make by operating independently in this way is infinitely more important than the disadvantages resulting from the presence of a few reactionaries in the representative body." - Karl Marx and Frederick Engels. Address of the Central Committee to the Communist League.  London, March 1850)
This year, after four decades of running working class, socialist candidates and putting our revolutionary position and party platform before the people of California, the Peace of Freedom has only two candidates for statewide office—Cindy Sheehan for Governor, and Nathalie Hrizi of the Party for Socialism and Liberation for California Insurance Commissioner. One more local candidate is planning to run: Robert Soloway, running in the 48th Congressional District in Orange County against right wing incumbent Dana Rohrabacher. In all the years we have had ballot status this is our fewest Peace and Freedom Party candidates. It does not provide a very good argument for our staying on the ballot.
In 2012, I ran for State Assembly in the 15th Assembly District that surrounds the Berkeley campus of the University of California and includes Richmond, Berkeley, and North Oakland. After the election, I wrote in what was "Definitely Not a Concession Speech:" "With over 13% of the vote, I refuse to concede to the incumbent, whose re-election was just part of the normal functioning of a corrupt and undemocratic electoral system. While the twin parties of capitalism spent billions of dollars to convince the American people to vote for politics-as-usual, our low-keyed Campaign for Peace and Socialism refused all campaign contributions and received 22,779 votes, or 13.2% of the total."
In 2014, the incumbent Nancy Skinner will be termed-out. At latest report, there are five Democrats and one Republican running in a district that is 64% Democrat, 8% Republican (SEE: “As Nancy Skinner's Assembly term nears end, 2014 hopefuls step forward - The Daily Californian” http://www.dailycal.org/2013/10/06/nancy-skinners-assembly-term-nears-end-2014-hopefuls-step-forward/). If the Democrats split their registrants equally, each will receive just under 13% of the vote, while the Republican will get 8%. The bulk of the remaining 28% are No Party Preference or one of the smaller parties (Peace and Freedom registration is under one percent. There is no particular reason to think I will get 13% of the vote as I did in 2012, but no reason to think I won’t. If I do, It could have me coming in second and advance to the General Election in November. Unlikely, it is true, but it is not the principle that motivates my campaign. As in my earlier campaigns, in 1982, 2008, 2010, and 2012, I will basing my campaign in 2014 on the principle set forth by Marx and Engels 160 years ago.
The requirements for running for state assembly are the least of any partisan office in California. The filing fee is $952.91, or 1,500 valid signatures in lieu of filing fee, gathered between December 27, 2013, and February 20, 2014. The in lieu signature requirement of 1500 may seem high, but they do not need to be registered Peace and Freedom. Anyone registered to vote in the 15th AD can sign. Considering this, the in lieu signature requirement does not seem any more stringent than the old requirement of 60+ Peace and Freedom registrants.
My campaign will support the campaigns of our statewide candidates by collecting signatures for Cindy and Natalie while I am collecting the 1500 for myself in Oakland, Berkeley, and Richmond. My primary method of signature gathering will be on college campuses. I suspect UC, Berkeley and Contra Costa College are the best places. Perhaps Berkeley City College is also a possibility, but they don’t really have a campus. Political gatherings and other venues will also be utilized for signature gathering.

Wednesday, December 18, 2013

Petition to add Cindy Sheehan to the ballot!

Help Get Cindy Sheehan on the Ballot,
Join the People’s Power Petition Campaign!
For more information on the Cindy Sheehan for Governor campaign, visit Cindy2014.org. For more information on the Peace and Freedom Party, visit PeaceAndFreedom.org.

What do YOU want for the future?
• CREATE THOUSANDS OF NEW JOBS IN CALIFORNIA BY CONVERTING TO PEACE TECHNOLOGY
• GET THE PROFIT MOTIVE OUT OF HEALTHCARE: IT'S TIME FOR SINGLE-PAYER
• LIVING WAGE FOR ALL CALIFORNIANS
• RESTORE FREE QUALITY EDUCATION IN CALIFORNIA

California allows candidates to get on the ballot in one of two ways:
• Pay a substantial sum of money, a “filing fee”
or
• Take your case to the people their signatures on a petition to show they want you on the ballot.
To get on California’s ballot as a gubernatorial candidate, Cindy Sheehan needs 10,000 signatures from registered voters.
So, if 100 people get just 100 signatures each we can get Cindy Sheehan on the ballot and spread the word about the campaign and the type of future we want to build in California.
Together we can make this work.
Volunteer Now!

"Peace and Freedom’s Cindy Sheehan Petitions for CA Gov"
2013-12-15 from [http://www.oppositionnews.org/articles/2013/q4/peace-n-freedoms-cindy-sheehan-petitions-ca-gov/]:
Sacramento -
Famed peace activist Cindy Sheehan is gearing up for a run for California Governor in 2014. Her supporters are already lining up volunteers to circulate ballot access petitions when the window to do so opens in a couple weeks. Once again, Sheehan is running under the Peace and Freedom Party banner.
For those who don’t remember, Cindy Sheehan first came to national prominence when she waged a public anti-war campaign targeted at President George W. Bush. Her heartfelt and touching story of having lost her son in the Iraq War hit home with many Americans. She has since run for Congress, Vice President and now California Governor.
It’s also worth reminding readers of her son’s final weeks on Earth. As detailed by Wikipedia, Casey Sheehan enlisted in the US Army in 2000, prior to 9/11. When the Iraq War began, he reenlisted. In 2004, his First Cavalry Division was deployed back into action. Two weeks later, Sheehan volunteered to be part of a Quick Reaction Force put together to rescue trapped American troops under heavy fire. Casey Sheehan was killed on that mission and posthumously awarded the Purple Heart and Bronze Star with Valor.
Cindy for Governor 2014
It’s too soon to know if Cindy Sheehan will have any challengers within the Peace and Freedom Party of California in her bid for Governor. But it’s not likely considering the longtime peace activist’s political following and the fact that she’s already received the official endorsement of the Party’s state Central Committee. And if her social campaign against George W. Bush or her political campaign against Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) are any indication, Gov. Jerry Brown is in for a fight.
When Cindy Sheehan took on George Bush in 2005, she literally moved to his home town of Crawford, Texas. When she ran for Congress against then Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, Sheehan moved to San Francisco. It’s safe to say, when Cindy Sheehan does something, she does it 100 percent.
“Please help with the Cindy for Governor 2014 campaign,” a recent email from Peace and Freedom organizers reads, “Our first priority right now is signature gathering to ensure Cindy gets on the ballot. We need 10,000 signatures in order to avoid paying a steep filing fee.” The window to collect petition signatures starts on December 27 and ends on February 20.
Cindy on the Issues
At the top of Gubernatorial candidate Sheehan’s platform is the environment. She opposes drilling, fracking and dependence on fossil fuels and instead supports a transition to, “sustainable, clean and renewable” energy sources. The candidate even lists two specific suggestions to support her position.
First, Sheehan proposes expanding public transportation, and most importantly, making it affordable for everyone. Second, she supports removing the laws and stigmas against industrial hemp. It’s long been known that one acre of hemp can produce as much paper as hundreds of acres of trees, if not more. The all-natural product was a staple of society until the mid-1900’s and is used to make things like clothes, paper, rope and a number of construction materials.
What Peace and Freedom candidate’s platform would be complete without a public position on world peace. And that’s second on Cindy Sheehan’s list. The campaign website explains, ‘Peace in our cities, communities and neighborhoods begins with economic and social justice. Free education and job programs will be at the forefront of our program so our young people will not have to feel that joining the US Military or California National Guard is an option. The California National Guard will only be used for state emergencies and not be sent over to foreign lands for the wars for Empire.’
Showing she’s not one to dodge the issues or play the ever-popular game of ‘smoke and mirrors’, Sheehan’s platform continues with positions on ‘Education’, ‘Prisons and the Police State’, ‘Agriculture’, ‘Healthcare’, ‘Immigration’, ‘Senior Citizens’, and in a nod to California’s Native Americans, ‘Indigenous Rights’.

The ground game -
Already, the California Peace and Freedom Party has launched a voter registration drive to sign up new voters. Research shows that most new voters, if they show up at the polls, will vote for the person or party that registered them. That could prove to be a boost to the party in the coming 2014 elections.
Illustrating their strategy, the Peace and Freedom Party website explains, ‘Registering PFP is an effective way to send a message to every politician, every day, that more and more Californians reject the two parties of war and big business, and support our pro-working class program. Having your name on the voter list as "Peace and Freedom" is like signing petitions for good causes every day, even when election day is far away. Politicians may pay attention to other things now and then (especially money), but they definitely pay attention to voter lists and voter registration statistics.’
Combining Cindy Sheehan’s support network with the Peace and Freedom Party’s precinct army may prove to be a successful combination. The candidate already has a large following from last year’s Presidential campaign where she was Roseanne Barr’s running mate. She also has an existing voter base from her 2008 Congressional run against Rep. Pelosi, an election that saw her finish second in a seven-way race, capturing over 46,000 votes.

Tuesday, December 17, 2013

"Cindy is running for Governor starting December 27, 2013"

For more information on the Cindy Sheehan for Governor campaign, visit Cindy2014.org.
For more information on the Peace and Freedom Party, visit PeaceAndFreedom.org.
---
December 15, 2013. Sacramento. Famed peace activist Cindy Sheehan is gearing up for a run for California Governor in 2014. Her supporters are already lining up volunteers to circulate ballot access petitions when the window to do so opens in a couple weeks. Once again, Sheehan is running under the Peace and Freedom Party banner.
For those who don’t remember, Cindy Sheehan first came to national prominence when she waged a public anti-war campaign targeted at President George W. Bush. Her heartfelt and touching story of having lost her son in the Iraq War hit home with many Americans. She has since run for Congress, Vice President and now California Governor.
It’s also worth reminding readers of her son’s final weeks on Earth. As detailed by Wikipedia, Casey Sheehan enlisted in the US Army in 2000, prior to 9/11. When the Iraq War began, he reenlisted. In 2004, his First Cavalry Division was deployed back into action. Two weeks later, Sheehan volunteered to be part of a Quick Reaction Force put together to rescue trapped American troops under heavy fire. Casey Sheehan was killed on that mission and posthumously awarded the Purple Heart and Bronze Star with Valor.
Cindy for Governor 2014
It’s too soon to know if Cindy Sheehan will have any challengers within the Peace and Freedom Party of California in her bid for Governor. But it’s not likely considering the longtime peace activist’s political following and the fact that she’s already received the official endorsement of the Party’s state Central Committee. And if her social campaign against George W. Bush or her political campaign against Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) are any indication, Gov. Jerry Brown is in for a fight.
When Cindy Sheehan took on George Bush in 2005, she literally moved to his home town of Crawford, Texas. When she ran for Congress against then Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, Sheehan moved to San Francisco. It’s safe to say, when Cindy Sheehan does something, she does it 100 percent.
“Please help with the Cindy for Governor 2014 campaign,” a recent email from Peace and Freedom organizers reads, “Our first priority right now is signature gathering to ensure Cindy gets on the ballot. We need 10,000 signatures in order to avoid paying a steep filing fee.” The window to collect petition signatures starts on December 27 and ends on February 20.
Cindy on the Issues
At the top of Gubernatorial candidate Sheehan’s platform is the environment. She opposes drilling, fracking and dependence on fossil fuels and instead supports a transition to, “sustainable, clean and renewable” energy sources. The candidate even lists two specific suggestions to support her position.
First, Sheehan proposes expanding public transportation, and most importantly, making it affordable for everyone. Second, she supports removing the laws and stigmas against industrial hemp. It’s long been known that one acre of hemp can produce as much paper as hundreds of acres of trees, if not more. The all-natural product was a staple of society until the mid-1900’s and is used to make things like clothes, paper, rope and a number of construction materials.
What Peace and Freedom candidate’s platform would be complete without a public position on world peace. And that’s second on Cindy Sheehan’s list. The campaign website explains, ‘Peace in our cities, communities and neighborhoods begins with economic and social justice. Free education and job programs will be at the forefront of our program so our young people will not have to feel that joining the US Military or California National Guard is an option. The California National Guard will only be used for state emergencies and not be sent over to foreign lands for the wars for Empire.’
Showing she’s not one to dodge the issues or play the ever-popular game of ‘smoke and mirrors’, Sheehan’s platform continues with positions on ‘Education’, ‘Prisons and the Police State’, ‘Agriculture’, ‘Healthcare’, ‘Immigration’, ‘Senior Citizens’, and in a nod to California’s Native Americans, ‘Indigenous Rights’.
The ground game
Already, the California Peace and Freedom Party has launched a voter registration drive to sign up new voters. Research shows that most new voters, if they show up at the polls, will vote for the person or party that registered them. That could prove to be a boost to the party in the coming 2014 elections.
Illustrating their strategy, the Peace and Freedom Party website explains, ‘Registering PFP is an effective way to send a message to every politician, every day, that more and more Californians reject the two parties of war and big business, and support our pro-working class program. Having your name on the voter list as "Peace and Freedom" is like signing petitions for good causes every day, even when election day is far away. Politicians may pay attention to other things now and then (especially money), but they definitely pay attention to voter lists and voter registration statistics.’
Combining Cindy Sheehan’s support network with the Peace and Freedom Party’s precinct army may prove to be a successful combination. The candidate already has a large following from last year’s Presidential campaign where she was Roseanne Barr’s running mate. She also has an existing voter base from her 2008 Congressional run against Rep. Pelosi, an election that saw her finish second in a seven-way race, capturing over 46,000 votes.

Friday, December 13, 2013

“Left Third-Party Organizing: Challenges and Opportunities”

2013-12-09 posted by "The North Star",
(Part 1) [http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NXohwWd3epg],
(Part 2) [http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mJelWibjiS8]:
In an age of two-party domination and neoliberal hegemony, what opportunities exist for left electoral politics through third party campaigns?
Why and when should leftists focus on third party campaigns, as opposed to Democratic Party primaries?
Where should the left focus its electoral resources, and how might it overcome division?
Should third-party politics be thought of in terms of consciousness-raising, or is the left in a position to affect public policy by taking power?





Chaired by Ben Campbell, with
* Carl Davidson (Committees of Correspondence for Democracy and Socialism),
* Tim Horras (Philly Socialists),
* Ursula Rozum (Green Party),
* Seamus Whelan (Socialist Alternative).

Tuesday, December 10, 2013

Campaign for Peace and Freedom in Hondruas!

Join the Peace and Freedom Party and the Solano Peace, Justice and Freedom coalition to Call on State Department to stop legitimizing fraudulent Honduran elections! Join the campaign here [link]! 

Peace and Freedom Party of California, in solidarity with the people of Honduras, calls on the U. S. government to cut U. S. aid and training to the Honduran military and police; withdraw U. S. troops and armed Drug Enforcement agents and contractors; and end U. S. intervention in Honduras" election particularly under the guise of "democracy promotion" funding by USAID and the National Endowment for Democracy. Furthermore, Peace and Freedom Party of California joins Amnesty International in calling on the authorities in Honduras to drop charges against three indigenous leaders; Berta Caceres, Tomas Gomez and Aureliano Molina.


"Call on State Department to stop legitimizing fraudulent Honduran elections"
[http://www.soaw.org/component/content/article/93-organizing-updates/4170-call-on-the-state-department-to-stop-legitimizing-fraudulent-honduran-elections]:
 On Sunday, November 24, Hondurans went to the polls in record numbers to vote in their presidential elections. In the country with the highest murder rate in the world and targeted repression of the opposition and social movements, many Hondurans voted for change, including for Xiomara Castro, the candidate for the new LIBRE party which was created out of the resistance to the 2009 SOA-graduate led coup that ousted her husband, President Mel Zelaya. Despite outright vote buying, vote counting problems, selling of election credentials, irregularities in posted voting certificates [http://www.soaw.org/about-us/equipo-sur/263-stories-from-honduras/4167-actas], discrepancies in the results released by Honduras' Electoral Tribunal (TSE) and those received by the parties, and other signs of fraud, Juan Orlando Hernandez of the ruling (National) party was declared the winner. Libre and PAC, another new party running on an anti-corruption platform, have refused to accept the TSE's results, citing widespread fraud, but the US has supported the ruling party, calling the elections "transparent." Call on the U.S. to stop legitimizing fraudulent elections in Honduras!
On Sunday, December 1st, thousands of Hondurans took to the streets demanding an end to fraud and the recognition of Xiomara Castro as the legitimate President of Honduras. See a photo report here [http://www.soaw.org/about-us/equipo-sur/263-stories-from-honduras/4168-electionphotos].
On Monday, December 2nd, Castro presented an official request to the TSE for a recount of all the voting certificantes in the presence of Libre. However, with the TSE, Executive Branch, current Congress, Supreme Court, and Attorney General all controlled by the ruling party (Hernandez himself led the Congress in firing 4 Supreme Court justices last year and replacing the Attorney General in a highly controversial process just months before the elections), there is little hope that Honduran system will resolve fairly.
The US State Department has white-washed the elections, commending the TSE for "its professional counting of the vote," when the reality is that the elections were full of problems. Send an e-mail to the State Department and Congress urging them to condemn the fraud, irregularities, and violence during the Honduran elections [http://org.salsalabs.com/o/727/p/dia/action3/common/public/?action_KEY=14682].
SOA Watch's election delegation to Honduras, along with many other delegations as part of the Honduras Solidarity Network observed problems with vote counting, reports of dead people voting, voting table credentials of other parties used by the ruling party, breaking of the rules during vote transmission, suspicious results from voting tables reported by the TSE, and numerous opportunities for alternation and manipulation of the results [http://www.hondurassolidarity.org/report1/].
Read the report back from the SOA delegation here [http://www.soaw.org/about-us/equipo-sur/263-stories-from-honduras/4162-novelections].
Libre has also documented numerous alternations and manipulations, including the tabulation of 82,301 too many votes counted in favor of the National (ruling) Party and 55,720 votes not counted for LIBRE [http://hondurasresists.blogspot.com/2013/11/libre-details-electoral-fraud-english.html].
Even the European Union election monitoring delegation, which white-washed the elections for political reasons, reported that 30% of the voter rolls were people who were dead or have left the country, making fraudulent voting all too easy [http://upsidedownworld.org/main/honduras-archives-46/4584-the-results-of-the-elections-in-honduras-were-changed-says-european-union-observer-].
The day before Libre activists prepared to take to the streets to demand a recount, Jose Antonio Ardon, a well-known member of the resistance movement and the motorcade that accompanied Xiomara Castro, was brutally murdered by death squads while organizing for Libre's march. This political assassination sent a clear message: you will continue to be murdered for speaking out. Prior to the elections, at least 18 Libre candidates and activists were murdered, more than all other parties combined. Two additional campesino leaders and Libre activists were murdered the evening before the elections as they returned from election training and a citizen was beaten on election day for asking for the votes to be read out loud as they were counted [http://hondurasresists.blogspot.com/2013/11/assasination-of-cntc-and-libre-party.html]. Just days after the elections, the police tear gassed and violently repressed thousands of university students protesting against fraud and the imposition of Juan Orlando as president of Honduras [http://www.truth-out.org/news/item/20293-violence-against-demonstrators-follows-contested-result-in-honduras-elections].
International observers were also intimidated, with migration raids targeting accredited observers from the Honduras Solidarity Network and other groups. The SOAW delegation, together with the US-El Salvador Sister Cities delegation, was blocked for over 5 hours from visiting Rio Blanco [http://www.soaw.org/about-us/equipo-sur/263-stories-from-honduras/4163-delegationrb], where Lenca communities are resisting the construction of an illegal hydroelectric dam and facing death threats and severe repression, including the murder of Tomas Garcia this July.
As Sunday's mobilization came to an end, Xiomara Castro stood beside the casket of Jose Antonio Ardon, which accompanied the mobilization outside the TSE to demand a recount of the votes, and declared "Today we have pain in our hearts and tears in our eyes and it is precisely because of this, and for the 350 other martyrs, that we will not give up. Because of this we continue. We believed the false promises that there would be clean elections… Over 1 million people went out to vote for us… They have stolen our victory and implemented fraud. We will not give up until we achieve… our hope of constructing a better Honduras for all".
As the ultra-right seeks to consolidate its stranglehold on Honduras through fraudulent elections aimed at imposing the presidency of Juan Orlando Hernandez and unleashing repression against those who stand up against the looting of the country by multinational corporations and the oligarchy, it is more important than ever to stand in solidarity with the people of Honduras. Demand that the US stop legitimizing the elections and instead condemn the widespread fraud and the murders of Libre activists [http://org.salsalabs.com/o/727/p/dia/action3/common/public/?action_KEY=14682].

Saturday, November 9, 2013

Seattle, on the cutting edge of community politics on the West Coast

Time to stop picking at the bits and pieces of this and learn some lessons.  We need to start on the local level--the grass roots.  Run for dog catcher. Run for sewer board. Run for City Council. Run for Board of Supervisors.  Run for a LOCAL office and get the Peace and Freedom party name out there in your community.  Enough with paper races, with state-wide races that don't bring us name recognition, much less winning seats.  Except for Cindy Sheehan, whose name is already known to many people, we should seriously reconsider our approach to the electorate and get serious about registering people for a party that is actually on the ballot in their own neighborhoods.  Now, not later.  Today, not tomorrow.



Four-term Seattle City Councilman Richard Conlin conceded to Socialist challenger Kashama Sawant late Friday afternoon, after Sawant once again increased a lead that now stands at 1,640 votes.
Read more at: [http://blog.seattlepi.com/seattlepolitics/2013/11/15/conlin-concedes-to-sawant/]

“Socialism in Seattle”
by Professor Eugene Ruyle:
As the economy tanks and the approval rating of Congress drops to an historic low of 5%, the city that gave us the Seattle General Strike of 1919 and the WTO Shutdown in 1999 is doing it again. Seattle is on the verge of electing a socialist to its City Council in 2013.
As of Friday afternoon, Nov 15, socialist Kshama Sawant, an Economics Professor at Seattle Central Community College and a prominent figure in Seattle's Occupy Wall Street movement, is leading in the race for Seattle City Council Position 2 by 1640 votes, with 50.30% to incumbent Richard Conlin’s 49.36%.
With about 25,000 votes left to count, she is in a strong position to be the first open socialist elected to city council in Seattle's history, and the first to win a citywide race in any major US city in generations.
Meanwhile, in Minneapolis, Ty Moore, another Socialist Alternative member, got 43% of the vote for City Council in Ward 9 of Minneapolis. This shows that Sawant’s strong showing is no fluke, but rather an expression of the frustration folks feel with “politics as usual” by Democrats and Republicans, by whatever name. Recent polls
As our comrades in Socialist Alternative observed, “Capitalism is in crisis here and internationally. Mass unemployment and institutionalized racism continue while we face the brink of further environmental devastation. The political establishment is more and more out-of-touch and discredited. This system offers no way out, but there is hope—millions are looking for a fundamental change, and Socialist Alternative is getting a better response for our ideas than ever before.”
There is indeed growing support for socialism, especially among minorities, youth, and the poor. A poll by the Pew Research Group found that socialism out-polls capitalism among Blacks (55% to 41%), Hispanics (44% to 32%), 18-29 year olds (49% to 46%), and those will family income less than $30,000 (43% to 39%). The rich, white, and elderly favor capitalism but not as strongly as one might think, with only 68% of those with family incomes over $75,00 having a positive view of capitalism, while 55% of whites and 52% of those 65 and older do so.
In 2012, socialism was dubbed the “Word of the Year” by Merriam-Webster. Let’s make 2014 the “Year of the Socialists.” It is definitely the year we in Peace and Freedom will be inspired by our comradess in Socialist Alternative.

For additional commentary, see
[http://www.votesawant.org]

[http://www.kirotv.com/news/news/seattle-city-councilmember-elect-shares-radical-id/nbxbC/]

[http://thenextrecession.wordpress.com/2013/11/18/socialism-in-seattle-and-rotten-economics-elsewhere/]

“Why Socialist Kshama Sawant's Campaign Matters, Win Or Lose” [http://kuow.org/post/why-socialist-kshama-sawants-campaign-matters-win-or-lose]

“Kshama Sawant, Socialist Alternative candidate in Seattle, is on pace to be elected to City Council” [http://www.socialistalternative.org/news/article22.php?id=2229]

“Kshama Sawant Pushes Ahead of Conlin; The Socialist Insurgent Is Now Beating the Incumbent—Who Already Declared Victory” [http://www.thestranger.com/seattle/kshama-sawant-pushes-ahead-of-conlin/Content?oid=18201682]

 “This is just the beginning” 2013-11-10 by Ty Moore [http://www.tymoore.org]

“Why Is Seattle Socialist Kshama Sawant Allowed To Teach Economics?” [http://www.forbes.com/sites/alexberezow/2013/11/11/why-is-seattle-socialist-kshama-sawant-allowed-to-teach-economics/]

“Socialist Sawant now leads Seattle council race by 41 votes; Kshama Sawant’s momentum in her race against longtime Seattle City Councilmember Richard Conlin has put her in position to win or to force a recount” [http://seattletimes.com/html/localnews/2022245420_sawantconlinxml.html]

“Kshama Sawant, Socialist Candidate, Is On The Verge Of Winning Seattle City Council Seat” [http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/11/13/kshama-sawant-socialist_n_4268733.html]

[http://www.thesocialist.us/statement-on-kshama-sawants-historic-victory-in-seattle/]

[http://www.salon.com/2013/11/18/capitalism_is_a_dirty_word_meet_the_nations_new_socialist_councilmember/]


"Socialist in Seattle: City councilor expects not to be a rarity for long; Kshama Sawant, rising from the Occupy movement, hopes to be the first of many new anti-corporate politicians in America"
2013-11-25 by Cedar Burnett from "Al Jazeera" [http://america.aljazeera.com/articles/2013/11/25/socialist-in-seattlenewcitycouncilorseesmorelikeher.html]:
SEATTLE — Kshama Sawant, Seattle's new socialist City Council member, bears little resemblance to the conventional image of a modern U.S. politician whose appearance — and policies — are often burnished by legions of advisers and focus groups.
A small, whip-smart Indian-American woman in faded jeans with a makeup-free face, she holds a Ph.D. in economics and was an early participant in the Occupy protest movement.
Sawant is not shy about her left-wing party affiliation — despite America’s modern habit of reacting with extreme hostility to the word "socialism," which is freely demonized on the right and treated with extreme caution even in progressive circles.
Yet Sawant is a clear exception. She told Al Jazeera that she was already going against convention by siding with the groups she sees as typically shut out of the political conversation — low-wage workers, women, immigrants and people of color — and so chose to identify her socialist affiliation to gain distance from a two-party system she sees as broken.
Now, having won office with a surprise result that captured national headlines, she is triumphant in tone and feels that being a socialist in America is not necessarily a ticket to electoral disaster, as it has been so many times in the past.
"We’ve shown that it’s possible to succeed in an openly socialist campaign, not taking any money from big business, not currying favor from the establishment and openly rejecting business as usual," said Sawant, speaking from a victory rally in Seattle that more closely resembled a religious revival than the glossy parties typically seen in modern politics.
Somewhere between the calls to "my brothers and sisters," the booing and the clapping, supporters rose to pledge donations — or, in the case of one elderly gentleman, denounce the actions of the rich to the rapt crowd. "I just want to say that I'm a member of the 1 percent, and I'm ashamed of my compatriots," said J.P. Shapiro, a retired attorney who forked over the maximum legal contribution for an individual.
A 41-year-old emigre from Mumbai, Sawant grew up observing the consequences of the caste system and abject poverty — though she herself was part of a middle-class family from the Brahman caste. She said such exposure would shape her later views and eventual conversion to socialism after her move to Seattle in 2006.
She said Seattle, like many major cities, is controlled by the Democratic Party establishment, which has abandoned the interests of its constituents and left people hungry for an alternative. She campaigned on leftist policies like raising the minimum wage to $15, taxing the rich and implementing rent control — shocking her opponents and local media, which confidently expected four-time incumbent Richard Conlin to emerge as the victor on election night.
Ever since Conlin's concession on Nov. 15, Sawant's supporters have continued to knock on doors and validate signatures to account for every vote. While the final tallies will be announced later on Monday, the gap has continued to grow in Sawant’s favor, with more than 90,000 votes cast for the college economics professor.
"People who have never voted before not only voted, but also volunteered for this campaign," said Ted Virdone, a Sawant volunteer himself. "Kshama's campaign means something completely different than the politics we've seen before."
For Sawant, "completely different" includes donating much of her new $120,000 salary, leaving her with "an average worker's wage." It also means talking about swinging hard left and attacking the capitalist economy as a failed experiment, unable to deliver the most basic needs for human survival — rare words in American politics.
"We have billions of workers doing backbreaking work all over the world who generate this phenomenal productivity the system enjoys," said Sawant. "These workers only get a little sliver of the wealth generated, and much of that wealth is siphoned off to the tiny global elite at the top."
Sawant said Americans are looking outside the two-party framework and aren’t afraid of socialism anymore. "The American public is well to the left of what the media will tell you, and well to the left of Congress. That’s why the popularity of Congress is at an all-time low," she said.
American socialists do have a long history to look back on. The Socialist Party of America won more than 900,000 votes in the presidential elections of 1912 and 1920, and elected two members to Congress, as well as winning many lesser posts in cities across the U.S. But since the 1920s and 1930s, the political fortunes of American socialists have dramatically decreased and — especially during the Cold War and afterward — the ideology has been routinely demonized and portrayed as unpatriotic.
It is doubtful that Sawant’s election in Seattle marks a sudden reversal of fortune. But her staff is adamant that times are changing, especially in the wake of the Great Recession, which spawned a debate about economic inequality and saw the rise, and fall, of the Occupy protest movement.
Devin Matthews, a staff member for Sawant’s campaign, points to a recent Pew research poll showing that the majority of young people ages 18 to 29 have a more favorable view of socialism than capitalism. "When they grow up seeing (right-wing media commentator) Glenn Beck screaming about socialists, they think, 'I don’t know what socialism is, but if Glenn Beck hates it, maybe I should check it out,'” Matthews said.
But not all are convinced. Joel Grus, a Seattle voter and data scientist, disagrees with Sawant's ideas. He says her policies will make it harder for low-skilled people to find a job in Seattle, and harder to attract entrepreneurial talent.
“I expect her term to be greatly entertaining,” said Grus, “particularly if she follows through on her threat to seize a Boeing factory and retool it to produce transit buses, or whenever she floats the idea of collectivizing Amazon.”

'Anointed by big business' -
However, Sawant doesn’t consider her goals particularly outrageous, and said there is a disconnect between public opinion and what the Democrats and Republicans are willing to deliver. Her campaign was launched with the help of Socialist Alternative, a political party active in at least 20 major American cities; she was supported by unions, the Green Party and the influential local weekly The Stranger. Many of her volunteers and staff were involved in the Occupy movement, both in Seattle and around the country.
"Corporate politicians get people to vote for them, but in reality they’re anointed by big business," she said. "They are not going to vote to tax the wealthy because they’re serving the wealthy."
While her primary focus is on the city of Seattle and its struggles with transportation, housing and wages, Sawant said she is unwilling to completely isolate the local fight from the global struggle in her discussions of the issues. She views the Occupy movement as a precursor to her election, both philosophically and in a literal sense as a generator of volunteers. She said the movement ended a public silence on a lot of things people were angry about, particularly the bailout of banks widely blamed for the financial collapse, high unemployment and an epidemic of foreclosures and evictions.
Those people are becoming increasingly vocal. Chris Gray, an organizer who drove out with a group from Minneapolis to help Sawant after a slim loss by another socialist candidate, thinks there’s nothing special about Seattle or Minneapolis.
“The conditions exist in every city for challenges like this,” he said.
While getting a socialist elected to the city council of a major U.S. city is hardly a political earthquake that will herald the rebirth of socialism in the mainstream of American politics, Sawant does not think it will be an isolated event.
“That’s not how history works,” she said. “This is a continuum where people learn lessons and progress to the next level — their political consciousness evolves and they gain confidence to fight for bigger things.
"Unless we relish the idea of our children being subjected to an endless battle for the same reforms over and over again, and seeing the expansion of poverty between every fight for reforms, we have to look for an alternative to capitalism."


"What's Needed"
2013-11-09 message from the campaign to elect Kshama Sawant [votesawant@gmail.com]:
It has taken a little while - nine long months of campaigning - but what was almost unthinkable last February is now, three days after the election, close to happening: Kshama Sawant, an open socialist, a voice for all of us who've been shut out of city government, is on the verge of being elected to Seattle City Council. And she will have beaten an entrenched, 16-year corporate incumbent to do it.
So it's only fitting that her victory is going to take a little while longer than we all thought, and cost a little bit more than we expected - and that, as a campaign fully funded by real, live people like you - with not a dime of corporate money - we must once again ask you to donate to help us cover the costs of these critical next few days.
Just as few people saw this coming - even three days ago, let alone nine months ago - Kshama's campaign hadn't budgeted for it, either. Staff is needing to be kept on, and the office kept open. There may be a recount, even legal fees. We will need to fight to make sure that every vote cast for Kshama is counted.
The election is over, but the ballot counting is not. Only a third of this year's ballots were counted on Election Night, when Kshama won 46 percent. Since then, King County Elections has released four more batches of ballots - ones that, like most of the remaining ballots, were cast in the last few days of the campaign as support for Kshama surged. In those, she has gotten, in order, 49 percent, 50 percent, 53 percent, and 56 percent. She is now only 4000 votes behind Richard Conlin. Depending on how many ballots remain, she will need between 53 and 55 percent of remaining votes to catch and pass Richard Conlin and become the newest member of Seattle City Council. She's already receiving those percentages. If they continue, she wins.
And, so, we must once again turn to the people who have already made the impossible so close to reality: you.
We need your financial help to ensure that Kshama's votes are counted and she is sworn in to the office we believe she has won. Make no mistake: There are plenty of people who would like to see her not pull this out. We can't let that happen.
A heartfelt thank you to each of you for all you've done to help bring Kshama's campaign to this point. We're almost there. Please donate now to make sure the impossible comes true!
For a better Seattle, Geov Parrish, Fundraising and Communications Director.
Vote Sawant!


"New numbers show victory is within reach - Now is the time to act!"
2013-11-08 message from the campaign to elect Kshama Sawant [votesawant@gmail.com]:
The latest King County total ballot count released at 4pm today shows Kshama Sawant at 48.96%! We are closing the gap!
The numbers are undeniable - victory is on the horizon! Now is the time to act. We are launching a massive Voter Protection Campaign to ensure every vote is counted. Current projections indicate that over 8,000 ballots will be disqualified, either because they are incorrectly filled out, not signed, or have other problems. We urgently need your help to reach out to these voters. We will be phone banking and going door-to-door with the necessary paperwork to ensure that their votes get counted.
We need all supporters and allies to dig deep and donate to the campaign so we can maintain our dedicated campaign staff for the final push until election certification on November 26th.
We are having a training session tomorrow and Sunday on how to re-qualify ballots. Join us at 11am at the Kshama Sawant Campaign Headquarters at 1265 Main Street, Suite 205. Immediately following the training, we will start tracking down disqualified ballots.
All Sawant supporters are welcome! No special skills are required, just a willingness to help get Kshama Sawant elected! Will you join us?
Together we will win this!
 PS. If you have a car, please bring it! It will vastly increase the efficiency of our Voter Protection Campaign operation. To volunteer, email us at VoteSawant@gmail.com or call Devin at 360-507-1321. Now is when it truly matters the most!


"Why Socialist Kshama Sawant's Campaign Matters, Win Or Lose"
2013-11-05 by Isolde Raftery [http://kuow.org/post/why-socialist-kshama-sawants-campaign-matters-win-or-lose]:
City Council candidate Kshama Sawant, a member of the Socialist Alternative Party, with Democratic Party supporters Daniel Norton and Jeanne Legault. Photo Credit KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Kshama Sawant didn’t have to identify as a socialist.
Seattle City Council races are nonpartisan, after all, and her views aren’t particularly revolutionary, as far as Seattle goes: She supports a $15 minimum wage (as do both mayoral candidates), unions for low-wage workers and rent control.
But branding herself as a socialist – still a dirty word in many corners of American politics – may have helped her rake in 35 percent of the primary vote with little money [http://your.kingcounty.gov/elections/2013aug-primary/results/]. (She had raised about $110,000 as of Monday night.)
Councilmember Nick Licata, who has been on the council for 16 years, said Sawant’s message resonates because a section of voters are tired of risk-averse Democrats and Republicans. Sawant, he said, has managed to make socialist ideas appeal to voters.
“We don’t have a mature socialist political movement in the country, and probably the last time we did was literally 80 years ago,” Licata said. “To Sawant’s credit, she has been able to craft a message that is understandable, simple and eschews most of the rhetoric.”
Sawant ran against Richard Conlin, 64, a darling of the Democratic party with left-leaning views. Conlin appeared to be winning on Tuesday night with 54 percent of the vote when King County released its first results. Sawant received about 46 percent of the vote.
Sawant stayed on message throughout her campaign, using dry, academic language to discuss the issues she wants addressed. The roots of homelessness are within the roots of our capitalist society itself, she said at the October debate.
Later, on the social media site Reddit, she addressed rent control [http://www.reddit.com/r/Seattle/comments/1pp763/my_name_is_kshama_sawant_candidate_for_seattle/]: "What rent control would do is provide housing security for tenants, who are at present continually forced to move due to rent increases demanded by price-gouging real estate companies. It would also address the serious income and race segregation in Seattle housing and enable low-income people, people of color, and immigrant communities to not be red-lined out of the city."
It appears that Sawant, 41, won support on the strength of her message alone. She is a Mumbai-educated economics professor who rarely strays from her platform and who avoids discussing her private life – although she has grudgingly admitted that she is separated from her husband. She doesn’t wear pantsuits or coiffe her hair, and she rarely points to her past experiences or to endorsements.
Sawant’s political campaign director, Philip Locker, an organizer for the Socialist Alternative party, said that by running for office, Sawant pushed neglected issues into the spotlight.
“We’ve gotten an enormous response – we’ve even forced both Mayor Mike McGinn and Sen. Ed Murray to discuss the $15 minimum wage,” Locker said of the mayoral candidates. “That’s powerful.”
When Sawant speaks, her supporters cheer. The Stranger has endorsed her enthusiastically, and The Nation magazine, based in Washington, D.C., wrote about her this week in equally glowing terms [http://www.thenation.com/blog/176972/seattles-another-world-both-possible-and-necessary-campaign#].
The Nation noted that Eugene V. Debs, the socialist candidate for president in 1912, received more than 10 percent of the vote in the Western states, including Washington.
Sawant’s campaign in Seattle speaks to a similar sense of disgruntlement with the two-party system, The Nation wrote, saying that a “bold rejection of austerity has significant popular appeal.”
But even a century ago, when Debs won more than one million votes nationwide, no socialist was this close to winning a city council position in Seattle, Scott Cline, the city’s archivist said.
City council elections have been nonpartisan since 1910, Cline said, but “I have never seen any records that indicate a city council member has self-identified as a socialist or belonged to a socialist party.”
Cline said that before 1910, a number of socialist candidates ran, but none seem to have made it out of the primary elections.
“It is certainly possible that after 1910 there might have been a serious socialist challenge,” Cline said in an email to KUOW. “However, no name from general elections stands out as a strong socialist candidate; certainly not on par with Kshama Sawant.”
Cline searched through the available voters’ pamphlets dating back to 1983 and found there has been just one other socialist candidate for Seattle City Council who did well – Yolanda Alaniz. Alaniz came in second among four candidates in 1991. She lost to Sue Donaldson, 131,872 to 27,991.
“Nevertheless, nearly 28,000 votes is quite amazing for a socialist candidate,” Cline said.
Licata said he believes that Sawant won’t be an anomaly and that more fringe candidates — on the left and the right — will run for office in coming years.
“My hope is that she doesn’t disappear after the election if she loses,” Licata said on Monday, before Tuesday night's results. “She represents the poor, the immigrants, the refugees – the folks who are not in our City Council offices lobbying us.”
On Tuesday night, Sawant told her supporters that she's not going anywhere. She hinted that she might run against Conlin again if she loses. And she said that she views the passing of the $15 minimum wage in SeaTac as evidence of the left rising up.


"I almost voted, credits socialist Kshama Sawant with cracking open one-party Seattle"
2013-11-05 by Bruce Ramsey from "Seattle Times" [http://seattletimes.com/html/opinion/2022197963_bruceramseycolumnkshamasawant06xml.html]:
For years I’ve grumbled about living in a one-party town, all Democrat all the time, where the range of acceptable opinion is “about this wide,” as a Democratic politician once expressed to me with his thumb and index finger. Maybe that changes. Maybe Seattle will have two parties: the Democrats and the Socialists.
That would not be my choice; it might be Seattle’s.
Left-wing candidates run fairly often around here, usually for nonpartisan seats. Three socialists were on Seattle ballots this year in addition to Indian immigrant and college instructor Kshama Sawant. The difference is, she runs. She holds rallies. She is a sharp speaker and has a way of putting her opponents on edge. She challenged both mayoral candidates to promise a $15 minimum wage.
Her red signs are everywhere.
A rule of practical politics is that a novice should aim for an open seat or a damaged incumbent. Sawant defies that rule. This year she took on longtime City Councilmember Richard Conlin, Democrat, who was not damaged. Last year she took on state House Speaker Frank Chopp, Democrat, who has a safe seat in Seattle’s 43rd district. Backed by The Stranger, Sawant made it into the top two as a write-in, identifying herself on the November 2012 ballot as “prefers Socialist Altern Party” — a Marxist party — and collected 29 percent of the vote.
 Sawant appeared to be losing Tuesday night by a significant margin, not surprisingly because she had to run citywide. But if Charter Amendment 19, the districts initiative, passes, she can run next time from Capitol Hill, and maybe Seattle will have a socialist on the City Council.
And that would be a remarkable thing. Seattle has not been ill-treated by global capitalism. Its metro area has the headquarters of Boeing Commercial Airplanes, Microsoft, Starbucks, Costco and Amazon. It has biotech. It has venture capital. It has sushi bars, craft distilleries and a Tesla dealership. Of the 39 counties in Washington, King County has the second-lowest rate of unemployment (San Juan is lowest) and the highest median household income.
The logical place for an anti-capitalist would be somewhere the economy left behind — downtown Yakima, maybe. But Seattle?
Sawant raised more than $100,000, most of it in the richest county in Washington. It was individual money. Among the $500-plus contributors, the most common occupation was software engineer. Her big donors included technical people who worked for Microsoft, F5 Networks, Google, Robbins and Boeing — all world-competitive companies. Sawant also went after endorsements. Who would endorse a candidate from a Marxist party? A former head of the King County Democrats did, as did an official of the Washington State Labor Council. Among donors is former state Sen. Eric Oemig, the Kirkland Democrat who in 2006 called on Congress to impeach President Bush.
Seattle has always had a left, though in the 20th century it learned to camouflage itself. Years ago, I wrote a profile of an activist who told me privately she was a socialist. If she were in Canada, she said, she could say it for publication. Not here. Later she won nonpartisan public office, where she was known as a progressive. I see her name among supporters of Kshama Sawant.
The candidate’s doctrines are not mine, but I give Sawant credit for what she has done. Under the guise of nonpartisan government, Seattle is a one-party town. Sawant raised $100,000 in small donations and attacked the monopoly head-on.
I almost voted socialist.

Friday, September 27, 2013

Join the Resistance! Defeat Climate Change with System Change!


Register to vote with the Peace and Freedom Party
HTTP://REGISTERTOVOTE.CA.GOV
The Peace and Freedom Party is committed to socialism, democracy, ecology, feminism and racial equality. [www.peaceandfreedom.org]. Download this page as a 4 page flier at [http://www.csulb.edu/~eruyle/why-ecosoc-reg-pfp.pdf], Produced by Gene Ruyle for the Campaign for Peace and Socialism [ru4peace.wordpress.com] [cuyleruyle@mac.com] [510-428-1578]



Defeat Climate Change with System Change!
"A human being is a part of a whole, called by us "universe," a part limited in time and space. He experiences himself, his thoughts and feelings as something separated from the rest… a kind of optical delusion of his consciousness. This delusion is a kind of prison for us, restricting us to our personal desires and to affection for a few persons nearest to us. Our task must be to free ourselves from this prison by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature in its beauty."  — attributed to Albert Einstein

Formed in the anti-racist and anti-imperialist struggles of the sixties, the Peace and Freedom Party has the strongest ecological stance of any ballot-qualified party in the United States. Alone among ballot-qualified parties, the Peace and Freedom Party locates the cause of our ecological crisis in capitalism and understands that any real solution must involve socialism. The Peace and Freedom Platform clearly states our position on capitalism, socialism, and ecology: "The same corporate forces and economic system that exploit and brutalize the world's working class people are destroying the world's biosphere. These social policies and ecological destruction often overlap. Socialism is necessary to end the ecological destruction caused by capitalism. Our goal is a society that is in harmony with nature as it is in harmony with its own people."
As early as 1970, before there was a Green Party and before the term ecosocialism was even coined, the Peace and Freedom Party included ecological concerns in its socialist program, with a call to: “Save the environment by prohibiting pollution, waste of resources and destruction of nature for profit.”
Ecological concerns have always played an important role in the Peace and Freedom program. In April 2011, the State Central Committee of the Peace and Freedom Party endorsed the Universal Declaration of the Rights of Mother Earth, adopted at the World’s People’s Conference in Cochabamba, Bolivia in April 2010.

Our foundational opposition to U.S. imperialism includes recognition of its role in destroying the Earth. Not only is the U.S. military the biggest polluter on the planet, it protects and serves the same corporate forces that are systematically pillaging the Earth and paving the way to eco-destruction.

As a non-sectarian, multi-tendency party, Peace and Freedom welcomes the participation of members of other socialist groups. For example the Party for Socialism and Liberation, Socialist Organizer, the Socialist Party, the Communist Party, and the Freedom Socialist Party have all been active within our ballot-qualified party. Our bylaws protect the formation of tendencies and the expression of various viewpoints.

The Peace and Freedom Party is an open, democratic, non-sectarian, multi-tendency, and movement-oriented political party, governed by the State Elections Code and our own Bylaws. Anyone eligible to vote in California can become a member of the Peace and Freedom Party simply by selecting Peace and Freedom Party under Political Party Preference while registering to vote. (There are also provisions for those who are prevented by law from voting to join the Peace and Freedom Party and participate in Party activity.)

The Peace and Freedom Party is governed by its State and County Central Committees. Any registered member can become a member of these Central Committees either through election in the June Primary election or by appointment by attending two Central Committee meetings. All meetings of the State Central Committee are open, with voting rights limited to SCC members.

Black Panther Eldridge Cleaver was Peace and Freedom’s First Presidential Nominee in 1968!

Peace and Freedom is not a vanguard party seeking to emulate the Bolshevik Party of 1917, although we respect such vanguard parties and welcome their participation. We provide an electoral alternative to the war addicted, pro-capitalist parties that dominate U.S. politics. In an era of the unchallenged supremacy of capital, it is worthwhile to have a political party, however small, to offer an alternative to the twin parties of corporate capitalism, unending war, and ecological insanity. Whatever its shortcomings, the Peace and Freedom Party has been uncompromising in our opposition to imperialism, uncompromising in our support for people’s struggles in California and throughout the world, and uncompromising in our support for the defense of our Mother Earth.

Many socialists of difference kinds—ecosocialists, democratic socialists, libertarian socialists, revolutionary socialists—feel it is important to publicly declare their opposition to capitalism. There is no more effective way to do this than by registering in the socialist Peace and Freedom Party.  Given the hegemony of bourgeois ideology, this may seem futile. But as Marx and Engels wrote concerning the importance of electoral activity even in the worst of times:
"Even where there is no prospect of achieving their election the workers must put up their own candidates to preserve their independence, to gauge their own strength and to bring their revolutionary position and party standpoint to public attention. They must not be led astray by the empty phrases of the democrats, who will maintain that the workers' candidates will split the democratic party and offer the forces of reaction the chance of victory. All such talk means, in the final analysis, that the proletariat is to be swindled. The progress which the proletarian party will make by operating independently in this way is infinitely more important than the disadvantages resulting from the presence of a few reactionaries in the representative body." (London, March 1850)

As we participate in a flawed and undemocratic electoral system, we recognize that our goals cannot be achieved by electoral means alone. We participate in mass organization and direct action in neighborhoods, workplaces, unions, schools, and the armed forces everywhere.
While organizing for the future, we work in the present, challenging the system with immediate and transitional goals, including:
·  shut down the war machine and bring our troops home,
·  guaranteed employment, with a dignified guaranteed income, free education and health care for all,
·  open borders and full rights for immigrants,
·  end all discrimination against immigrants, women, LGBT, and minorities, with marriage equality.
·  no compromise in defense of our Mother Earth.
Our personal and political freedoms are under sustained attack by the forces of corporate capitalism which include both the Democratic and Republican Parties. Signing petitions, demonstrating in the streets, and direct action are all important, as is an electoral challenge informed by the working class science of socialism.
If you share our values, join the resistance by registering Peace and Freedom Party at [registertovote.ca.gov]

Thursday, September 26, 2013

Support the Oil Tax to Fund Education Act

You can call the California State Senate President Darrell Steinberg's office at 916-651-4006 or the Speaker of the California State Assembly John Perez's office at 916-319-2408, and ask them or your assemblyman or senator to sponsor the OIL TAX TO FUND EDUCATION ACT, which will generate $4 billion annually for California Public and Higher Education!

The Act is registered at the State of California [lao.ca.gov/laoapp/ballot_source/BalDetails.aspx?id=916], where it is described as follows: "This measure imposes a 15 percent “severance tax” on the value of all oil and gas extracted in California or its state offshore waters, which extend out three miles from the coastline. Oil and gas produced in federal waters would be exempt, and wells capable of producing less than ten barrels per day of oil or 60,000 cubic feet of gas per day would be exempt when the value of a barrel of oil or gas from those wells was $50 or lower. The measure states that the costs of the tax may not be passed on to consumers."

The Act is authored by Peter Mathews [562-234-3319] [epetermathews.com], who relates the following:
"When I first started teaching in California Community Colleges in 1976 my students paid no tuition. They were only required to pay a $6 service fee for all 15 units. If you paid the same rate today that Arnold Schwarzenegger paid as a student in the 1970s at Santa Monica College ($6 for all 15 units) you would be paying only $24 today because of inflation. Lets bring back these rates by asking your Assemblyman and State Senator to sponsor the OIL TAX TO FUND EDUCATION ACT (this Act prohibits passing on the oil tax in higher gas prices), of which I am the lead author. This bill is ready to be introduced into the California State Assembly and/or the California State Senate, in legal language."

Friday, September 6, 2013

Support Peace and Freedom on the ballot

Brothers and sisters,
The Peace and Freedom Party's voter registration drive needs more money!  Even if you can only give a few dollars, please see if you can make a donation today. 
A very large percentage of people who register to vote, and are told about the Peace and Freedom Party and our total dedication to the needs of working people, are willing to register as Peace and Freedom Party voters.  The only problem is, someone has to ask them.  Every penny of the money in our registration fund goes to  register voters, none is used for administrative expenses or fund-raising expenses.  Please help us make our goal of 105,000 Peace and Freedom Party voters in California by late 2014.  Please help secure your right to vote for candidates other than corporate-controlled  Republicans and Democrats in California.  Help us retain our ballot status, and help us keep fighting for the rights and needs of working people. 
Please spread this message to your friends. We appreciate any support you can provide. Thank you!      
- [signed] Kevin Akin, State Chair, Peace and Freedom Party

Checks made out to “PFP Registration Drive” should be mailed to:
PFP Reg Drive, PO Box 22234, Sacramento CA 95822,
or you may donate on-line at: [www.peaceandfreedom.org/home/regdrive].

Message from Peace and Freedom Party Registration and Organizing Committee:
The 2012 elections brought us more of the same: war and oppression abroad, austerity and repression at home. Across the nation progressive community activists are responding by working at the local level to effect the change we’ve learned not to expect from our elected representatives. A Gallup poll shows that over half of voting age Americans want a third political party.
The Peace and Freedom Party was born of the anti-war and civil rights movements in the 1960s. We have run candidates who have supported reductions in the military budget, single payer healthcare, full employment, and free education as a right. Our activists build local clout and awareness on these issues and more, connecting the peoples movements to electoral politics without knuckling under to the super-rich who control both big parties.
Peace and Freedom is again going national. We are now a ballot qualified party in Florida as well as California, and working toward ballot qualification in several other states, and we are building a national organizing committee.
Due to changes in election law, the Peace and Freedom Party must sharply increase our voter registration numbers from approximately 62,000 registrants to about 105,000 registrants by the end of 2014 in order to stay on the ballot in California. We will do it, but it is a difficult and costly process, and we anticipate raising and spending about 85 thousand dollars on it. If you care about having a voice for peace and economic justice on the ballot, we urge you to help in the following ways:
Register to vote as “Peace and Freedom Party” if you live in California by filling out a new voter registration form, either by picking one up at a library, DMV office, or Registrar of Voters office, or by registering online at: registertovote.ca.gov. It would also be very helpful for you to encourage supportive friends and family to register Peace and Freedom. (In California today, you may vote for candidates of any party in both primary and general elections regardless of the party in which you are registered.)
Donate to the Peace and Freedom Party Registration Drive, no matter where you live. Your donation enables Peace and Freedom to train teams of youth organizers throughout California to register Peace and Freedom Party voters. Please join in enabling a new generation of progressive activists to secure a ballot alternative that reflects their ideals, addresses their concerns and champions their future.
Please spread this message to your friends. We appreciate any support you can provide. Thank you!
Yours for peace and freedom, Cindy Sheehan
(Organizations listed for identification purposes only.)
* Gerald Horne, PhD, JD, University of Houston   
* John Reiger, President, Veterans for Peace, Sacramento Chapter
* Gloria La Riva, President, Typographical Sector, CWA Local 39521   
* Mike Roskey, SEIU Local 1000, District Labor Council 767, President
* Alice Stek, MD, University of Southern California School of Medicine   
* Kevin Akin, California State Chair, Peace and Freedom Party
* Paul Krassner, Satirist and publisher   
* Kathleen Williams, Attorney at law
* John Fugelsang, Host of “Viewpoint” on Current TV   
* Scott Camil, President, Veterans for Peace, Gainesville Chapter


Cindy Sheehan interviews!

Register to vote for Cindy Sheehan as next CA Governor... [www.peaceandfreedom.org]

2013-09-04 on "The Morning Mix", broadcast on KPFA, 94.1FM in Berkeley:
Peace and Freedom Party anti--war activist and gubernatorial candidate Cindy Sheehan talks about the issues on "The Morning Mix with Anthony" with Anthony Fest on Berkeley, California's KPFA 94.1 FM on September 4, 2013.


2013-08-31 on "The Morning Mix" with Project Censored, broadcast on KPFA, 94.1FM in Berkeley:

Sunday, August 25, 2013

Plataforma del Partido de Paz y Libertad de California



El Partido Paz y Libertad de California, fundado en 1967, esta comprometido con el socialismo, la democracia, la ecología, el feminismo y la igualdad racial. Nos organizamos para alcanzar un mundo donde la cooperación reemplace la rivalidad, un mundo en donde toda la gente tenga alimento, vestido y vivienda; en donde todas las mujeres y los hombres tengan el mismo nivel, en donde los individuos puedan libremente dedicarse a desarollar sus talentos y deseos; un mundo de libertad y paz en donde cada comunidad conserve su integridad cultural y viva con todas las demás en armonía.

Ofrecemos este resumen de nuestra visión para el presente y el futuro:
Doblar el salario mínimo y ajustarlo al costo de vida.
Garantizar el derecho de todos los trabajadores a organizarse y lanzarse a la huelga y prohibir el uso de empleados de reemplazo.
Trabajos socialmente útiles para todos con sueldos a nivel de sindicalizados.
Igualdad de pago pr trabajo semejante o por trabajo de valor comparable.
Semana de trabajo de 30 horas sin reducción de salario, y mas vacaciones pagadas.
Ingreso digna y garantizado para aquellas que no puedan trabajar.
Un Pago Básico Universal para aliviar la pobreza y la falta de vivienda.
Gravar los ingresos y los bienes de los ricos para satisfacer las necesidades del bienestar popular.
Los acuerdos de comercio internacionales deben garantizar la proteccion de los trabajadores y el medio ambiete en todos los países participantes; abolir el GATT, el NAFTA y el OMC (WTO).
Acabar con el problema habitacional de personas sin casa, derogar lay leyes contra la vagancia; proveer habitación decente y acessible para todos.
Propiedad social y control democrático de la industria, las instituciones financieras y los recursos naturales.
Los Estados Unidos deberán tomar la iniciativa hacia un desarme global con la eliminación de armas nucleares, químicas y biológicas.
Retirar las tropas y armas de los Estados Unidos de otros países. Utilizar el "dividendo de la paz" para el beneficio social.
Eliminar la CIA, NSA, AID y otras agencias que interfieren en los asuntos internos de otros países.
Convertir de una economía de guerra a una economía orientada a la paz, con trabajo para los trabajadores desplazados.
Autodeterminación para todas las naciones y pueblos del mundo, incluyendo Puerto Rico y los territorios coloniales de los Estados Unidos.
Defender y ampliar las libertades garantizadas por la Ley de Derechos.
Acabar con la discriminación basada en razo, sexo, edad, orientación sexual o impedimentos personales.
Restaurar la Acción Afirmativa; garantia completa de derechos de educación y empleo para todos.
Abolir la pena de muerte.
Prohibir el trabajo para ganancia privada en las prisiones.
Apoyar el derecho de la gente trabajadora a poseer y portar armas.
Elecciones democráticas a traves de representación proporcional; derechos políticos, sociales y económocas completos para residentes no naturalizados.
Respetar los tratados con las naciones de los indígenas americanos; reconocer las naciones de los indígenas en California. Defender y extender los derechos y soberanias de los indígenas americanos.
Proveer educación publica gratuita y de buena calidad a traves el nivel universitario. Enseñar la historia de las luchas de los trabajadores y la funcion de los trabajadores en la generación de riqueza y progreso del mundo.
Restaurar y fortalecer la educación bilingüe.
Fondos gubernamentales para que la gente comun, libremente crie y disfrute el arte.
Investigación científica y tecnológica para beneficio de la gente comun, y no solo para los capitalistas.
Ofrecer tratamiento de salud de alta calidad gratuito para todos, incluyendo control natal, aborto, tratamiento prenatal y tratamiento a infantes. No a la esterilización forzada.
Legalizacion de la mariguana, abolir cargos criminales por el uso de drogas, y libremente ofrecer tratamiento gratuito para casos de abuso de drogas.
Prestar atención especial a la prevención de epidemias de enfermedades mortales, tales como el SIDA. Garantizar los derechos de las personas afectadas por el SIDA.
Restablecer y proteger la calidad del aire, el agua, la tierra y los ecosistemas.
Promover la conservación de energia, y el desarrollo de energía solar y de otras fuentes de energía renovable para reemplazar a los combustibles fosiles y la energía nuclear.
No tirar tóxicos nocivos sobre las comunidades, incluyendo en colonias de las minorias.
Desarrollo masivo de transporte público gratuito o con tarifas economicas.
Prohibir el método de corte total de los bosques y proteger los bosques ancestrales.
Promover un sistema solido de agricultura que a la vez sea sano para el ambiente, que llene las necesidades humanas y proteja los derechos laborales de los campesinos con un modo de vida confortable.

Friday, August 9, 2013

Why our primary email address has been suspended

[SolanoPFP@lavabit.com] is no longer active, as it was shut down along with the 60,000 addresses serviced by "Lavabit.com", a free encrypted email service which guarantees security for dissidents, in response to the demand by United States DHS for information about it's users.

2013-08-08 "Encrypted email Lavabit used by Snowden shuts to avoid 'complicity in crimes against Americans'" [http://rt.com/usa/lavabit-email-snowden-statement-247/]:
The highly encrypted email service reportedly used by NSA leaker Edward Snowden has gone offline - and its administrator claims the company is legally barred from explaining why.
 On Thursday, the homepage of Lavabit.com was changed to a letter from the company’s owner announcing that the site’s operations have ceased following a six-week long ordeal that has prompted the company to take legal action in the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals.
 Now in the midst of an escalating fight from the federal government aimed at cracking down on encrypted communications, one of the last free and secure services has thrown in the towel under mysterious circumstances.
 “I have been forced to make a difficult decision: to become complicit in crimes against the American people or walk away from nearly ten years of hard work by shutting down Lavabit. After significant soul searching, I have decided to suspend operations,” owner and operator Ladar Levison of Dallas, Texas wrote in the statement. “I wish that I could legally share with you the events that led to my decision. I cannot.”
 “I feel you deserve to know what’s going on--the First Amendment is supposed to guarantee me the freedom to speak out in situations like this. Unfortunately, Congress has passed laws that say otherwise,” wrote Levison. “As things currently stand, I cannot share my experiences over the last six weeks, even though I have twice made the appropriate requests.”
 Levison’s statement comes two months after Snowden - a former analyst at intelligence contractor Booz Allen Hamilton - revealed himself to be the source of leaked NSA documents disclosing vast surveillance programs operated by the United States government. A month later, the Global Post published an article in which a Lavabit.com email address thought to be registered to Snowden was revealed.
 The Global Post wrote on July 12 [http://www.globalpost.com/dispatch/news/regions/europe/russia/130712/edward-snowden-meeting-moscow-airport] that the Sheremetyevo Airport press conference hosted by Snowden later that day was announced to human rights groups under the email address "edsnowden@lavabit.com" and signed by “Edward Joseph Snowden.” Washington Post foreign affairs blogger Max Fisher and Guardian journalist Glenn Greenwald have both since reported that Lavabit is indeed Snowden's email provider.

During a Q&A session hosted by The Guardian last month, Snowden wrote, “Encryption works. Properly implemented strong crypto systems are one of the few things that you can rely on.”
 Although Lavabit’s website is now almost entirely inaccessible, a cached version hosted by Google provides background on why and how the service provided highly secure encryption to its users.
 “In an era where Microsoft and Yahoo’s e-mail services sell access past their spam filters, Google profiles user’s inboxes for targeted advertising, and AT&T allows the government to tap phone calls without a court warrant; we decided to take a stand,” one page reads. “Lavabit has developed a system so secure that it prevents everyone, including us, from reading the e-mail of the people that use it.”
 By combining three different encryption schemes with Elliptical Curve Cryptography, Lavabit provided a service purposely designed to provide protection against government surveillance.
 “The result is that once a message is stored on our servers in this fashion, it can’t be recovered without knowing a user's password. This provides a priceless level of security, particularly for customers that use e-mail to exchange sensitive information,” the company wrote.
 “The key element of the PATRIOT Act is that it allows the FBI to issue National Security Letters (NSLs). NSLs are used to force an Internet Service Provider, like Lavabit, to surrender all private information related to a particular user. The problem is that NSLs come without the oversight of a court and can be issued in secret. Issuing an NSL in secret effectively denies the accused an opportunity to defend himself in court. Fortunately, the courts ruled NSLs unconstitutional in 2005; but not before illustrating the need for a technological guarantee of privacy,” the cached page reads.

“Lavabit believes that a civil society depends on the open, free and private flow of ideas. The type of monitoring promoted by the PATRIOT Act restricts that flow of ideas because it intimidates those afraid of retaliation. To counteract this chilling effect, Lavabit developed its secure e-mail platform. We feel e-mail has evolved into a critical channel for the communication of ideas in a healthy democracy. It’s precisely because of e-mail’s importance that we strive so hard to protect private e-mails from eavesdropping.”
 Lavabit noted that brute force attacks could theoretically allow a third-party to see password-protected emails but said that such attacks shouldn't be happening anytime soon.
 “In practice, the key lengths Lavabit has chosen equal enough possible inputs that a brute-force attack shouldn’t be feasible for a long time to come.”
 According to Snowden’s Q&A with The Guardian last month, “endpoint security is so terrifically weak that NSA can frequently find ways around it.”
 Now as Levison and crew prepare for a fight in appeals court, he suggests that very few are safe from having even secure emails stolen by the US government.
 “This experience has taught me one very important lesson: without congressional action or a strong judicial precedent, I would _strongly_ recommend against anyone trusting their private data to a company with physical ties to the United States,” Levison said in the statement.
 On a since removed page from Lavabit.com, the company wrote, “Like insurance, we hope our secure e-mail platform is something you’ll never need. However, should the issue ever arise, like insurance, you’ll be glad you have it.”
 Earlier this year, Federal Bureau of Investigation general counsel Andrew Weismann said the US Justice Department wants to be able to decrypt all messages sent over the internet in real-time by the end of 2014.
 “The problem with not having [that ability in America] is that we’re making the ability to intercept communications with a court order increasingly obsolete,” Weissman said. “Those communications are being used for criminal conversations, by definition…and so this huge legal apparatus that many of you know about to prevent crimes, to prevent terrorist attacks is becoming increasingly hampered and increasingly marginalized the more we have technology that is not covered” under current law.
 According to a cached page of the company's history, Lavabit was launched in 2004 and most recently handled service for upwards of 60,000 individuals at a rate of around 200,000 emails a day.
 “How many Lavabit users have just been impacted by the hand of attempted government oppression in secret?” security researcher Jacob Appelbaum tweeted on Thursday. “The path chosen by Lavabit is an honorable choice. It is also horrible that they must now ruin their company to try to keep their integrity.”

In an email to RT, Appelbaum said, “It seems rather obvious that the US government surveillance agenda is out of control.”
 “This isn't a matter of 'a surveillance program' - the issue isn't just passive wiretapping, it include[s] actively breaking into people's computers, as well as storing the data for retroactive policing,” added Appelbaum. “Welcome to the United States of American Total Surveillance. A State over all other States.”
 Appelbaum himself is no stranger to the government’s surveillance policies and has had his own personal data thrown under Uncle Sam’s magnifying glass in the past. A known volunteer with the anti-secrecy website WikiLeaks, Appelbaum was the subject of federal subpoenas served to both Google and a small-time Internet Service Provider that compelled them to hand over private emails. Twitter was also served with a subpoena for Mr. Appelbaum’s user info.
 Lavabit representatives did not immediately return requests for comment.


2013-08-09 "Email service used by Snowden shuts itself down, warns against using US-based companies; Edward Snowden - 'Google, Facebook, Microsoft, Yahoo, Apple, and the rest of our internet titans must ask themselves why they aren't fighting for our interests the same way'"
by Glenn Greenwald from "theguardian.com" [http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/aug/09/lavabit-shutdown-snowden-silicon-valley]:
A Texas-based encrypted email service recently revealed to be used by Edward Snowden - Lavabit - announced yesterday it was shutting itself down in order to avoid complying with what it perceives as unjust secret US court orders to provide government access to its users' content. "After significant soul searching, I have decided to suspend operations," the company's founder, Ladar Levinson, wrote in a statement to users posted on the front page of its website. He said the US directive forced on his company "a difficult decision: to become complicit in crimes against the American people or walk away from nearly ten years of hard work by shutting down Lavabit." He chose the latter.
CNET's Declan McCullagh smartly speculates that Lavabit was served "with [a] federal court order to intercept users' (Snowden?) passwords" to allow ongoing monitoring of emails; specifically: "the order can also be to install FedGov-created malware."
[https://plus.google.com/112961607570158342254/posts/EujgUYbrEwv]:

After challenging the order in district court and losing - all in a secret court proceeding, naturally - Lavabit shut itself down to avoid compliance while it appeals to the Fourth Circuit.
This morning, Silent Circle, a US-based secure online communication service, followed suit by shutting its own encrypted email service [http://gigaom.com/2013/08/09/another-u-s-secure-email-service-shuts-down-to-protect-customers-from-authorities/]. Although it said it had not yet been served with any court order, the company, in a statement by its founder, internet security guru Phil Zimmerman, said: "We see the writing on the wall, and we have decided that it is best for us to shut down Silent Mail now."
What is particularly creepy about the Lavabit self-shutdown is that the company is gagged by law even from discussing the legal challenges it has mounted and the court proceeding it has engaged. In other words, the American owner of the company believes his Constitutional rights and those of his customers are being violated by the US Government, but he is not allowed to talk about it. Just as is true for people who receive National Security Letters under the Patriot Act, Lavabit has been told that they would face serious criminal sanctions if they publicly discuss what is being done to their company.
[ ... ]
Snowden, who told me today that he found Lavabit's stand "inspiring", added:
"Ladar Levison and his team suspended the operations of their 10 year old business rather than violate the Constitutional rights of their roughly 400,000 users. The President, Congress, and the Courts have forgotten that the costs of bad policy are always borne by ordinary citizens, and it is our job to remind them that there are limits to what we will pay.
"America cannot succeed as a country where individuals like Mr. Levison have to relocate their businesses abroad to be successful. Employees and leaders at Google, Facebook, Microsoft, Yahoo, Apple, and the rest of our internet titans must ask themselves why they aren't fighting for our interests the same way small businesses are. The defense they have offered to this point is that they were compelled by laws they do not agree with, but one day of downtime for the coalition of their services could achieve what a hundred Lavabits could not.
"When Congress returns to session in September, let us take note of whether the internet industry's statements and lobbyists - which were invisible in the lead-up to the Conyers-Amash vote - emerge on the side of the Free Internet or the NSA and its Intelligence Committees in Congress."

Monday, July 29, 2013

Sunday, July 28, 2013

Voices of the People: Dorothy Day (d. 1980)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dorothy_Day], retrieved 2013-07:
Dorothy Day, Obl.O.S.B. (November 8, 1897 – November 29, 1980) was an American journalist, social activist, and devout Catholic convert; she advocated the Catholic economic theory of distributism. Day "believed all states were inherently totalitarian," and was considered to be an anarchist and did not hesitate to use the term. In the 1930s, Day worked closely with fellow activist Peter Maurin to establish the Catholic Worker movement, a nonviolent, pacifist movement that continues to combine direct aid for the poor and homeless with nonviolent direct action on their behalf.
The cause for Day's canonization is open in the Catholic Church, and she is thus formally referred to as a Servant of God.

Early life -
Dorothy Day was born in the Brooklyn Heights neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York, and raised in San Francisco and Chicago. She was born into a family described by one biographer as "solid, patriotic, and middle class". Her father, John Day, was a Tennessee native of Scots-Irish heritage, while her mother, Grace Satterlee, a native of upstate New York, was of English ancestry. Her parents were married in an Episcopalian church located in Greenwich Village, a neighborhood where Day would spend much of her young adulthood.
In 1904, her father, who was a sports writer, took a position with a newspaper in San Francisco. They lived in Oakland, California, until the San Francisco Earthquake of 1906 destroyed the newspaper's facilities and her father lost his job. The earthquake's devastation and how people helped homeless victims became strongly ingrained in the young Dorothy's memory. The family then relocated to Chicago.
Day was an avid reader as a child. She was particularly fond of Upton Sinclair, Jack London, and hagiographies of Catholic saints. She had also read Peter Kropotkin, an advocate of anarchist communism, which, along with these others, influenced her ideas in how society could be organized. In 1914, Day attended the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign on a scholarship, but dropped out after two years and moved to New York City. Day was a reluctant scholar. Her reading was chiefly in a radical social direction. She avoided campus social life and insisted on supporting herself rather than live on money from her father, a characteristic she was to maintain for the rest of her life, to the point of buying all her clothing and shoes from discount stores to save money.
Settling on the Lower East Side, she worked on the staffs of Socialist publications (The Liberator, The Masses, The Call), though she "smilingly explained to impatient socialists that she was ‘a pacifist even in the class war.’" She also engaged in anti-war and women's suffrage protests, spent several months in Greenwich Village, where she became close to Eugene O'Neill, and later joined the Industrial Workers of the World ('Wobblies'). She rejoiced at the success of the Bolshevik Revolution in Russia, as she relates in "From Union Square to Rome". She maintained friendships with such prominent American Communists as Mike Gold, Anna Louise Strong, and Elizabeth Gurley Flynn (who became the head of the Communist Party USA), all of whom she praised and eulogized in the Catholic Worker. In the November 1949 issue, she described herself as an "ex-Communist," and in the January 1970 issue she declared that the Catholic Worker is "a revolutionary headquarters rather than a Bowery mission, as most newspapers like to picture us."

Spiritual awakening -
Roots -
Dorothy's parents were nominal Christians, rarely attending church. As a young child, she showed a marked religious streak, though, reading the Bible frequently. When she was ten she started to attend an Episcopalian church, after its rector had convinced their mother to let the Day brothers join the church choir; she became taken with the liturgy and its music. She studied the catechism and was baptized and confirmed in the church. Despite this she saw herself as agnostic.
Initially Day lived a bohemian life; her short marriage to Berkeley Tobey occurred "on the rebound" after an "unhappy love affair with a tough ex-newspaperman named Lionel Moise" and an abortion,[15] which she later described in her semi-autobiographical novel, The Eleventh Virgin ISBN 978-0983760511 (1924)—a book she later regretted writing. The sale of the movie rights to the novel enabled her to settle down, using the proceeds to buy a beach cottage on Staten Island, New York. She lived there with Forster Batterham, a biologist with whom she shared a deep interest in social activism. It was a time of idyllic peace for her, as she shared the company of good friends and enjoyed the beauty of nature, which Batterham helped her to appreciate.
During this period, however, Day began a time of spiritual awakening which would lead her to embrace Catholicism. She had picked up a rosary in New Orleans during the course of her many moves around the country and started to recite the canticles she had learned at her childhood church in Chicago. She began to attend Mass on Sundays at the nearby Catholic church.
This growing interest in religion became a continuing source of conflict and division between Day and Batterham, who had a deep aversion to religion. Unexpectedly, Day found that she was pregnant. As her partner opposed having children, this became another source of conflict. Despite his opposition, she resolved to have her child and to have it baptized, to give the child a spiritual foundation she had lost herself. In all her travels, Day had identified with the people of the working class, and everywhere she went the majority had been Catholics. Thus, she chose to give her allegiance to that faith.
After the birth of her daughter, Tamar Teresa (1926–2008), Day chanced to meet Sister Aloysius, S.C., a Catholic Religious Sister, walking down her street. She asked the Sister how she could have the child baptized. Sister Aloysius helped her, requiring Day to memorize the Baltimore Catechism for this. Tamar's baptism was opposed by Batterham, who continued to live with Day and the child in Staten Island when he was not working in Manhattan. Day loved him deeply and respected him for his stand on social causes, putting off any move to join the Church because she did not want to lose him. This tension, she reported, led to illness and resulted in a nervous condition.

Conversion -
Exasperated, Day broke up with Batterham; she refused to take him back when he returned after an emotional "explosion" had occurred. She then went immediately to Sister Aloysius to arrange for admission to the Catholic Church. This took place in December 1927, with her conditional baptism (due to her prior baptism in the Episcopalian Church) at Our Lady Help of Christians Parish on Staten Island. In her 1952 autobiography, The Long Loneliness, Day recalled that immediately after her baptism she made her first Confession and the following day she made her First Communion.
In the summer of 1929, Day decided to leave New York temporarily, partly to put the situation with Batterham behind her, and also to accept work as a screen writer in Hollywood. She moved with Tamar to Los Angeles. She returned to New York just as the effects of the Great Depression were beginning to be felt. Later, Day began writing for Catholic publications, such as Commonweal and America on the events of that situation around the country. She began to feel separated from the protesters in the streets, feeling a lack of leadership from her new faith.
In the early 1940s she became a Benedictine oblate, which gave her a spiritual practice and connection that sustained her throughout the rest of her life. As described in her letters in "All the Way to Heaven," she left the Benedictines for a time to consider joining the Fraternity of Jesu Caritas, which was inspired by the example of Charles de Foucauld. Day felt unwelcome there and disagreed with how meetings were run. When she decided to return to the Benedictines and withdraw herself as a candidate in the Fraternity, she wrote to a friend, "I just wanted to let you know that I feel even closer to it all, tho it is not possible for me to be a recognized 'Little Sister,' or formally a part of it".

The Catholic Worker Movement -
Peter Maurin -
In 1932, Day met Peter Maurin, the man she would always credit as the founder of the movement with which she is identified. Maurin, a French immigrant and something of a vagabond, claimed to be from a family which had occupied the same farm which their distant ancestor had received as a bonus for service in the Roman army. He had entered the Brothers of the Christian Schools in his native France, before emigrating, first to Canada, then to the United States.
Despite his lack of formal credentials, Maurin was a man of deep intellect and decidedly strong views. He had a vision of social justice and its connection with the poor which was partly inspired by St. Francis of Assisi. He had a vision of action based on a sharing of ideas and subsequent action by the poor themselves. Maurin was deeply versed in the writings of the Church Fathers and the papal documents on social matters which had been issued by Pope Leo XIII and his successors. Through this knowledge, Maurin provided Day with the grounding in Catholic theology of the need for social action both felt. Years later Day described how Maurin also broadened her knowledge by bringing "a digest of the writings of Kropotkin one day, calling my attention especially to Fields, Factories, and Workshops; Day observed: "I was familiar with Kropotkin only through his Memoirs of a Revolutionist, which had originally run serially in the Atlantic Monthly. (Oh, far-[past] day of American freedom, when Karl Marx could write for the morning Tribune in New York, and Kropotkin could not only be published in the Atlantic, but be received as a guest into the homes of New England Unitarians, and in Jane Addams' Hull House in Chicago!)"

The Catholic Worker -
The Catholic Worker movement started with the publication of the Catholic Worker, first issued on May 1, 1933. It was established to promote Catholic social teaching in the depths of the Great Depression and to stake out a neutral, pacifist position in the war-torn 1930s. (See the Catholic Worker: The Aims and Means of the Catholic Worker.) This grew into a "house of hospitality" in the slums of New York City and then a series of farms for people to live together communally. The movement quickly spread to other cities in the United States and to Canada and the United Kingdom; more than 30 independent but affiliated CW communities had been founded by 1941. Well over 100 communities exist today, including several in Australia, the United Kingdom, Canada, Germany, the Netherlands, the Republic of Ireland, Mexico, New Zealand, and Sweden.

Fame -
By the 1960s, Day was embraced by a significant number of Catholics, while at the same time, she earned the praise of counterculture leaders such as Abbie Hoffman, who characterized her as the first hippie, a description of which Day approved, though there is some evidence which indicates Day might not always have taken a positive view of the hippie movement.
Although Day had written passionately about women’s rights, free love, and birth control in the 1910s, she opposed the sexual revolution of the 1960s and beyond, saying she had seen the ill effects of a similar sexual revolution in the 1920s. Day had a progressive attitude toward social and economic rights, alloyed with a very orthodox and traditional sense of Catholic morality and piety. A daily communicant, Day was unable to prevent the irregularities that occurred at the Tivoli Catholic Worker Farm. In her diary she relates the criticisms of Stanley Vishnewski, then declares, "But I have no power to control smoking of pot, for instance, or sexual promiscuity, or solitary sins." She supported church teaching on abortion.
Her devotion to her church was neither conventional nor unquestioning, however. She alienated many U.S. Catholics (including some clerical leaders) with her condemnation of the authoritarian Falangist Francisco Franco during the Spanish Civil War; and, possibly in response to her criticism of Cardinal Francis Spellman, she came under pressure by the Archdiocese of New York in 1951 to change the name of her newspaper, "because the word Catholic implies an official church connection when such was not the case." The newspaper's name was not changed. Day cast a critical look at the United Fruit Company as she praised communes in Communist China and Russia, as well as Fidel Castro's "promise of social justice"; she declared, " 'Thou art neither cold nor hot ... because thou art lukewarm ... I am about to vomit thee out of my mouth,' our Lord says. Far better to revolt violently than to do nothing about the poor destitute."She also praised Ho Chi Minh as "a man of vision, as a patriot, a rebel against foreign invaders."

Awards -
In 1971, Day was awarded the Pacem in Terris Award of the Interracial Council of the Catholic Diocese of Davenport, Iowa. It was named after the 1963 encyclical by Pope John XXIII which calls upon all people of good will to secure peace among all nations. Pacem in Terris is Latin for "Peace on Earth." Day was accorded many other honors in her last decade of life, including the Laetare Medal from the University of Notre Dame in 1972. Day had refused to participate in civil defense drills during the Cold War.

Later life and death -
Despite suffering from poor health, Day traveled around the world to preach the power of "God's love" and the way of pacifism. She went to India, where she met Mother Teresa and saw her work. In 1971, with the financial support of Corliss Lamont, who she described as a "'pinko' millionaire who lived modestly and helped the Communist Party USA," Day made a trip to the Soviet Union as part of a "peace pilgrimage."She met with three members of the Writers' Union to defend Alexander Solzhenitsyn against charges that he "sold out" the USSR; Day informed her readers that "Solzhenitsin lives in poverty and has been expelled from the Writers Union and cannot be published in his own country. He is harassed continually, and recently his small cottage in the country has been vandalized and papers destroyed, and a friend of his who went to bring some of his papers to him was seized and beaten. The letter Solzhenitsin wrote protesting this was widely printed in the west, and I was happy to see as a result a letter of apology by the authorities in Moscow, saying that it was the local police who had acted so violently." The travel restrictions on tourists did not prevent Day from going to the Kremlin, and she reported: "I was moved to see the names of the Americans, Ruthenberg and Bill Haywood, on the Kremlin Wall in Roman letters, and the name of Jack Reed (with whom I worked on the old Masses), in Cyrillac characters in a flower-covered grave.... I felt that my former roommate, at the University of Illinois, Rayna Prohme, should have had a flower-bedecked grave along the Kremlin wall also. She had edited a paper in Hankow, had accompanied Madame Sun Yat Sen to Moscow when Chiang Kai Shek had taken over the Communist dominated city, and was preparing to continue her work as a dedicated Communist when she died in Moscow." She joined Cesar Chavez in his efforts to provide justice for farm laborers in the fields of California. There, at the age of 75, she was arrested with other protesters and spent ten days in jail. From 1972 to 1978 she was a part-time resident of the now-demolished Spanish Camp community in the Annadale section of Staten Island.
Day gave her final public appearance at the Eucharistic Congress held on August 6, 1976, in the City of Philadelphia to honor the Bicentennial of the United States. She spoke on the love God has for humanity and the need to spread that love throughout creation. Day characteristically tied in her message to the anniversary of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima on that day.
Shortly after this, Day suffered a heart attack. She died on November 29, 1980, at Maryhouse in New York City.
Day was buried in the Cemetery of the Resurrection on Staten Island, just a few blocks from the location of the beachside cottage where she first became interested in Catholicism.

Cause for sainthood -
A proposal for Day's canonization was put forth publicly by the Claretian Missionaries in 1983. At the request of Cardinal John J. O'Connor, made as head of the diocese in which she lived, in March 2000 Pope John Paul II granted the Archdiocese of New York permission to open this cause, thereby officially allowing her to be called a "Servant of God" in the eyes of the Catholic Church.
In keeping with canon law, the Archdiocese of New York then submitted this cause for endorsement by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops. In November 2012, during the course of a semi-annual meeting, and at the urging of the current Archbishop of New York, Cardinal Timothy M. Dolan, President of the organization, the Conference formally endorsed this cause. In introducing this "consultative" item, Cardinal Dolan gave his fellow bishops the following "clarification": "you’re not being asked to indicate whether or not you consent to the cause--I hope you do--but if you have any objections, there’ll be chances for you to express those during the cause. What I’m seeking your opinion about is the opportuneness of advancing the cause on the local level."
The cause is attracting criticism from members of the Catholic Worker Movement she founded, with claims that this prominence would contradict Day's own values and concerns.
In the Episcopal Church, Dorothy Day is listed as a person "worthy of commemoration" in the liturgical calendar but for whom not enough time has elapsed since her death; the current guidelines of the Episcopal Church for an official commemoration in the calendar include waiting fifty years after the death of the one being commemorated. "Local and regional commemorations" are encouraged.

Legacy -
Her autobiography, The Long Loneliness, was published in 1952. Day's account of the Catholic Worker movement, Loaves and Fishes, was published in 1963. A popular movie called Entertaining Angels: The Dorothy Day Story was produced in 1996. Day was portrayed by Moira Kelly, and Peter Maurin was portrayed by Martin Sheen, actors later known for their roles on The West Wing television series in the United States. Fool for Christ: The Story of Dorothy Day was a one-woman play performed by Sarah Melici, which premiered in 1998 and performed until 2011. A DVD of the play has been produced. The Catholic Worker had a circulation of more than 100,000 for some years (Roberts, pp. 179–182) and now has a circulation of under 30,000 (Catholic Worker, "Statement of Ownership, Management, and Circulation," December 2012).
The first full-length documentary about Day, Dorothy Day: Don't Call Me a Saint, by filmmaker Claudia Larson, premiered on November 29, 2005, at Marquette University, where Day's papers are housed. The documentary was also shown at the 2006 Tribeca Film Festival and is now available on DVD. Day's diaries, The Duty of Delight: The Diaries of Dorothy Day, edited by Robert Ellsberg, were published by the Marquette University Press in 2008. A companion volume, All the Way to Heaven: The Selected Letters of Dorothy Day, also edited by Ellsberg, was published by the Marquette University Press in 2010. Also published in 2010 was Carol Byrne's study of Day, The Catholic Worker Movement (1933-1980): A Critical Analysis. Bill Kauffman of The American Conservative has written of Day: “The Little Way. That is what we seek. That—contrary to the ethic of personal parking spaces, of the dollar-sign god—is the American way. Dorothy Day kept to that little way, and that is why we honor her. She understood that if small is not always beautiful, at least it is always human."
Day's belief in smallness also applied to the property of others, including the Catholic Church, as when she wrote: "Fortunately, the Papal States were wrested from the Church in the last century, but there is still the problem of investment of papal funds. It is always a cheering thought to me that if we have good will and are still unable to find remedies for the economic abuses of our time, in our family, our parish, and the mighty church as a whole, God will take matters in hand and do the job for us. When I saw the Garibaldi mountains in British Columbia . . . I said a prayer for his soul and blessed him for being the instrument of so mighty a work of God. May God use us!"
Day also spoke of "how to bring about a revolution of the heart, a revolution which has to start with each one of us?"
Day also admired Ernesto "Che" Guevara and quoted his view of revolution: "'Let me say, at the risk of seeming ridiculous, that the true revolutionary is guided by great feelings of love.' Che Guevara wrote this."
Day has been the recipient of numerous posthumous honors and awards. Among them: in 1992, she received the Courage of Conscience Award from the Peace Abbey, and in 2001, she was inducted into the National Women's Hall of Fame in Seneca Falls, New York.
Day's life was marked by controversy. The Catholic Worker lost many subscribers when it took a pacifist stance in World War II.
Despite Pope John XXIII's excommunication of Fidel Castro on January 3, 1962, Day traveled to Cuba in late 1962 and praised Castro's "social reforms" in a four-part series in the September, October, November, and December 1962 issues of the Catholic Worker. In the September 1962 article, she declared, "I am most of all interested in the religious life of the people and so must not be on the side of a regime that favors the extirpation of religion. On the other hand, when that regime is bending all its efforts to make a good life for the people, a naturally good life (on which grace can build) one cannot help but be in favor of the measures taken." Day also ignored the requests of New York Chancery officials, representing Cardinal Spellman, that she stop using "Catholic" in the title of her paper, according to the published accounts of Ammon Hennacy and Michael Harrington (Troester, pp. 208–209; Isserman, p. 76) and others in the movement (Byrne, pp. 206–208). Byrne asserts that Day attempted to advance a "Christian Communism," presented Lenin and Marx as secular saints, and never gave up her belief in class warfare. As another example, Roberts notes that Father Daniel Lyons, S.J., "called Day 'an apostle of pious oversimplification.' He charged that the Catholic Worker 'often distorted beyond recognition' the position of the Popes".

Memorialization -
Day's accomplishments have been memorialized in many ways. Dormitories at Lewis University in Romeoville, Illinois, University of Scranton in Scranton, Pennsylvania, and Loyola University Maryland are named in her honor. A named professorship at St. John's University School of Law is currently held by labor law scholar David L. Gregory. At Marquette University, a floor bearing Day's name has been reserved for those drawn to social justice issues. The Office of Service and Justice at Fordham University bears her name, at both of the university's campuses in the city: the one at Lincoln Center in Manhattan and its main campus in the Bronx. Saint Peter's College of Jersey City, New Jersey, named their Political Science Office the Dorothy Day House.
Broadway Housing Communities, a supportive housing project in New York City, opened the Dorothy Day Apartment Building at 583 Riverside Drive in 2003. Several Catholic Worker communities are named after Day.